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Saturday, June 11, 2016

Celery For A Youthful and Active Body




Natural sodium-rich foods keep one youthful and active by keeping muscles limber and pliable.
Many people who lack natural sodium have stiff joints and cracking knees.

Apart from its youthful properties, natural sodium also acts as an acid neutralizer and blood cleanser. Having the right amount of natural sodium in our system will not only prevent arthritis, neuritis, and rheumatism, it's good for the brain and nervous system, too.

Natural sodium can be found in vegetables like celery.  Celery is perfect for juicing with other fresh vegetables because of its cooling properties. But it is popularly mixed in soup and salad.

Celery plants like full sunning, watering every other day (or when partly dry) and having organic fertilizer monthly. (Visit Plant Care for more information.)


Em-em Tinasas, MBA
The Gardener

Source:

Jensen, B. (2004). Foods that heal: A guide to understanding and using the healing powers of natural foods. Paharanj, New Delhi. Health & Harmony.  

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Organic Soil, Insects, and Insect Bites on Leaves

Image from: www.atlanticavenuegarden.com

It is easy to grow herbal and herb plants, but just watering these like decorative plants will not assure the nutritional benefits that we expect to get. Herbs are just like vegetables that need extra care to be able to supply good health.

Organic Soil Mix

Most herbal and herb plants need a good mixture of soil to be healthy. Garden soil is loose when wet, but too tight when dry. Adding sand loosens up soil, thus providing aeration and also good drainage to bring out excess water.  It is also important to note though, that there are some herbs which prefer just sand with compost. An example of this is chamomile. But regardless of soil mix, organic fertilizer should be applied monthly so as to give the herbs, herbals and vegetables that required proper nutrition. (Visit Plant Care for more information).

Insects

Insects are part of the food chain.  Although there are beneficial insects, non-beneficial insects need to be driven away to prevent infestation for the herbs to survive.  When I water my herbs, I add crushed Oregano or any minty herb. When I pour it on the leaves, stems and soil, I often see insects flying away.  Even herbs that do not need daily watering, surely, do not mind a little water trickling down their leaves and stem - just to get rid of insects affecting them. Oregano water can also be sprayed or be squeezed out from a recycled dishwashing bottle.

Insect Bites on Leaves

Insects are obvious when you see black hairy creatures lying down on the leaves comfortably or hiding under leaves by pairs or in groups. But some insects are trickier to spot because they are too small.  When non-beneficial insects are not very visible, their presence can manifest in the reaction of the leaves. Leaves with insects and eggs tend to have a different form as compared to others. These can curl up, have a different color, or may even stick together. Some stems may even have black spots on them.

If any of the leaves or stems have insects and eggs, just remove the infected parts so that the plant may survive.  Crushed oregano may also be applied directly on the plant to prevent more infestation. Any minty herb may be used as natural pesticide.  Also, the infested stems and leaves can be soaked in water overnight to kill the pests and eggs. These may be used as mint water for the plants the next day.

In the natural world, there is no such thing as “harmful insects” since everything in this world is interconnected, according to Dr. Shinya, author of The Enzyme Factor.  This is why I retain leaves with insect bites (with no eggs), because the insect’s body, hands and feet, while in contact with the plant, leave  an enzyme called chitin-chitosan. This enzyme is found in the hard shell covering of the insect’s body which is the same enzyme found in the shell of shrimps and crabs. Chitin-Chitosan enzyme is an additional nutrient for herbs and also vegetables which is the factor that is absent in edible plants that are contaminated with chemicals and pesticides.

Gardening is challenging with the presence of insects.  But it is good to know that insects, whether helpful or termed as “harmful” have such a valuable, nutritious and delicious contribution.   

Em-em Tinasas, MBA
The Gardener

Source:

Shinya, H. (2014). The enzyme factor: Diet for the future. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers (P) Ltd.

Monday, March 21, 2016

Thyme for Respiratory Infections



Thyme originated from the Mediterranean.  Its name came from thymus, which means fumigate.

As a kitchen herb, it is used to flavor tomato sauces and is a great stuffing for meat, lamb and chicken.

As a herbal tea, it induces sweat and eases colds and bronchitis, and helps heal indigestion. This is also effective for asthma since it relaxes the spasm in the airways.  It has a moistening effect that causes one to expectorate.  Thyme sterilizes the lungs which makes it a front liner for respiratory infection.  Since it is known for its bacterial and anti-fungal properties, it is part of the ingredients for Vicks Ointment and Listerine mouthwash.

As a herbal bath, this herbs eases rheumatism and muscular aches and pains.

Thyme wants light soil and full sun for best aroma.  It needs watering every other day or when already partly dry and organic fertilizer monthly. (Visit Plant Care for more information.)


Em-em Tinasas, MBA
The Gardener

Sources:
Harding, J. (2002). Holistic herbs: An introductory guide to the healing power of herbs. Bath: Parragon Publishing


Cammarata, J. A guide to herbal remedies: Safe and effective remedies for achieving and maintaining health. New Delhi: Goodwill Publishing House

Rosemary for Stress and Headaches



Rosemary is a tall, woody evergreen shrub that can grow up to 3 meters.  Its scientific name is Rosmarinus officinalis. It was used as incense during ancient times.

As a kitchen herb, it flavors chicken, lamb and red meat well.

For wellness, rosemary-infused teas help heal headaches and relieve stress. It should be taken only thrice a day like any tea. Rosemary tea should only be taken for a week maximum. It also should not taken by pregnant women.

It is a good tonic for the hair and scalp.  The tea can be mixed with shampoo. (Visit Hair Products: Shampoo, Conditioners, Dye and Green Tips.)

Rosemary needs full sun, watering every other day or when partly dry and organic fertilizer monthly. (Visit Plant Care for more information.)

Get your Rosemary at www.herbalandherbs.wordpress.com!


Em-Em Tinasas, MBA
The Gardener

Source:


Harding, J. (2002). Holistic herbs: An introductory guide to the healing power of herbs. Bath: Parragon Publishing

Coriander for Metal Detox



Coriander is mentioned in the Ebers Papyrus dated around 1550 BC.   This is also one of the oldest spices mentioned in the Egyptian documents 1000 years ago.  Its scientific name is Coriandrum Sativum. It is also called cilantro, coriander, or Wansoy (Chinese parsley).

 As a kitchen herb, it can be used as a dip for fried, broiled or steamed fish or meat by mixing leaves with onion, tomato and vinegar. It can also flavor noodles, salads, curry and Indian dishes.

For wellness, it is effective for flatulence, and nervous tension. The seeds act as digestive stimulant by increasing gastric juices. It is good for the kidney. It is a good metal detoxifier and is also referred as the “Poor Man’s Chelation” which removes aluminum, lead, mercury contamination trapped inside the body. (Visit Metals: Home Appliances and Heavy Metal Contaminationfrom Fish, Aluminum Cookers and Pans, and Coriander Detox.)

Coriander needs well-drained soil, full sun, watering every other day (or when partly dry) and organic fertilizer every month.  Its leaves are effective pesticides. (Visit How to Care for your Herbal and Herbs for more information.)

Em-Em Tinasas, MBA
The Gardener

Source:


Harding, J. (2002). Holistic herbs: An introductory guide to the healing power of herbs. Bath: Parragon Publishing

Peppermint for Indigestion, Colds and Aches



Peppermint is a perennial plant which is a crossbreed between water mint and spearmint.  In the Philippines, it is called Herba Buena or “good herb”.  Its scientific name is Mentha x piperita. Ancient Greeks and Romans used this for d├ęcor for feasts and an ingredient for sauces.
As a kitchen herb, it can be used as minty topping for salads, added to chicken, meat or fish, and for sauces.

As a herbal tea, it can soothe indigestion and colds. Fresh or dried leaves can be made into herbal tea. Fresh leaves can be eaten, or crushed on aches and pains like headache, sinusitis, arthritis, etc. to directly apply enzymes. It may be slightly placed under the fire before direct application. It can also be made into homemade oil for massage for body pains and before bath. (Check Herbal and Herbs in Personal Care for more information.)

For plant care, peppermint needs part sun exposure, daily watering and organic fertilizer monthly. (Visit Plant Care for more information.)

Get your Peppermint at www.herbalandherbs.wordpress.com!

Em-Em Tinasas, MBA
The Gardener

Source:

Harding, J. (2002). Holistic herbs: An introductory guide to healing of herbs. Bath: Parragon Publishing

Lavender for Fatigue and Stress



Lavender was brought by the Romans to Britain.  Its scientific name is Lavandula Angustifolia.
As a herbal tea, the dried flowers soothe fatigue, stress and tension.  The flowers, stem and leaves are made into essential oil. You can make homemade oil. (Visit Herbal and Herbs in Personal Care for more information.)  

It requires full sun and watering every other day, or when partly dry. Put organic fertilizer monthly.  (Visit Plant Care for more information.)

Em-Em Tinasas, MBA
The Gardener

Source:


Harding, J. (2002). Holistic herbs: An introductory guide to healing of herbs. Bath: Parragon Publishing